New Year’s Resolutions Are A Sham

Quick! Someone call “Guinness Book Of World Records” because come January 1st millions of people worldwide will attempt to do the exact same thing— commence their New Year’s resolutions.

It’s the time of year when lists are magnetically fastened to refrigerators, reminders are set to do mild exercises at the most inopportune times, kale smoothies become breakfast, and countless other goals set forth by people wanting, and needing, anywhere from minor to major life changes. We have all been here. Nothing inherently wrong with it.

Recently, a friend asked me if my wife and I are “resolution people”.  I answered with a feeble and unconvincing, “I guess so.”  I had never been asked that question before to be honest.  It’s always been a more direct question like, “What are your New Year’s resolutions?”, as if to assume I certainly need any.  I don’t take offense to much, but I could see where a direct question like that could cause a snowflake to melt and evaporate in less than a Planck instant.  “Are you resolution people?”…  I gotta say, it produced some thinking.

I began to realize based off of this question, that though I may set resolutions, I can not truly call myself a “resolution person”.  But come to think of it, does setting resolutions make me, or anyone else, a “resolution person”?  Anyone can make a list and either complete it or not.  What good is a resolution to lose 20 pounds only to put it back on later in the year during the holidays?  Not much of a resolution if you ask me.  The meaning of resolution is; the act or process of resolving; the act of solving.  It is a very direct, absolute word.

Olympic athletes have a resolve. Doctors have a resolve.  Navy Seals have a resolve.  All these people, and of the like, categorically have resolved within themselves to live a certain way; to become certain people; to let nothing stop them on who they intend to be.  The goal isn’t necessarily the resolution. No. The resolution is the person.  True resolutions should be inward. It’s not something you should limit to a list of does and don’ts.  It is something you resolve to become, and furthermore— remain.

We can have our “bucket list” type things to do as New Year’s goals, like skydive or climb Everest.  Those are good, awesome things.  But setting one adventurous goal pales in comparison to resolving to be an adventurous person.  I will forever believe that who we are will always transcend what we do.

This new year, I resolve to become a Person of Resolution.